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authorintrigeri <intrigeri@boum.org>2016-12-28 08:32:44 +0000
committerintrigeri <intrigeri@boum.org>2016-12-28 08:32:44 +0000
commite081742a6039fb5b988019ac7b4b6370810b690c (patch)
tree4a29e17a9ae81932e84cb53f5b9aef52c89ceaf8
parentaecf387e252dce0239bfb0529edb9001c9740d6c (diff)
Drop documentation about filesystem shares: we don't use them anymore (refs: #5571).
-rw-r--r--wiki/src/contribute/release_process/test/automated_tests.mdwn19
1 files changed, 0 insertions, 19 deletions
diff --git a/wiki/src/contribute/release_process/test/automated_tests.mdwn b/wiki/src/contribute/release_process/test/automated_tests.mdwn
index ff184f4..9053dce 100644
--- a/wiki/src/contribute/release_process/test/automated_tests.mdwn
+++ b/wiki/src/contribute/release_process/test/automated_tests.mdwn
@@ -350,25 +350,6 @@ Although very rare, the remote shell can get into a state where it
stops responding, resulting in the test suite waiting for a response
forever.
-## Host-to-guest filesystem shares are incompatibile with snapshots
-
-Filesystem shares cannot (due to QEMU limitations) be added to an
-active VM, and cannot (due to QEMU limitations) be active
-(i.e. mounted) during a snapshot save. For this reason, don't use
-filesystem shares in combination with snapshots. For more
-information, see [[!tails_ticket 5571]].
-
-On a more practical note, you *can* add a filesystem share if you
-restore a snapshot and then power off the computer, which still is
-worth it when there's a big setup cost, e.g. when Tails is running
-from USB with persistence enabled. So something like this is valid,
-for example:
-
- Given Tails has booted without network from a USB drive with a persistent partition and stopped at Tails Greeter's login screen
- And I shutdown Tails and wait for the computer to power off
- And I setup some filesystem share ...
- And I start Tails from USB drive "current" with network unplugged and I login with persistence enabled
-
## Plugging SATA drives
When creating a disk (at least when backed by a `raw` image) via the